Remember the Ice Bucket Challenge?

Last summer, the ice bucket challenge went viral and took the internet and the world by storm all for the benefit of future ALS research and raising awareness. While awareness was certainly raised,  ALS organizations raised large amounts of money as well. The question on many people’s’ mind quickly became, “What will they do with all that money?” and many feared that such organizations would instead funnel the money toward other viral attempts.

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One organization that raised a lot of money, the Washington D.C. based ALS Association (ALSA), was quick to act on the growing ice bucket challenge trend that is said to have began in a Massachusetts community showing support to resident that was diagnosed with ALS years earlier. Although many criticized the ice bucket challenge as just another internet trend similar to the Harlem Shake craze, the end result shows just how successful it was.

By the time that the ice bucket challenge began to lose momentum, ALSA had raised over $115 million. Other organizations around the world supporting ALS research and awareness also saw similar results, as the trend became a global phenomenon. But then the challenge became what to do with all that money and, more importantly, how to use it properly.

ALSA has been one of the organizations to release a breakdown of how they spent that amazing windfall, which amounted to five times their usual revenue for the previous year. Those who donated and those who were at first critical of the power of the ice bucket challenged became worried that instead of putting the money to use toward ALS related issues, nonprofits would instead use it to continue gaining attention in attempts to go viral. However, the breakdown provided by ALSA, which has received the most out of any organization related to ALS, proves that those fears weren’t realized.

Of the $115 million raised, 70% of it went to funding ALS research, 20% is being spent on ALS patient care and community service. The remaining 10% has gone toward continued fundraising initiatives and covers administration costs

Source: http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/may/30/als-after-the-ice-bucket-challenge